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Habakkuk
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Habakkuk

Habakkuk says nothing about its author, date or purpose, but seems to be a cry to God from the miseries of the exile, answered by a prophecy of Babylon's fate. Someone called Habakkuk is mentioned in the Greek version of Daniel which is found in the Apocrypha.

Commentary

1:15

The two types of net mentioned here are the two traditionally used on Galilee: a throwing net used from a boat, or a seine net dragged by people on the shore.[1 p.53]

2:3

This is a message to a hurried society, like ours.

2:6f

These verses seem to foretell the doom of the oppressor Babylon.

2:11

cf. Luke 19:40.

2:20

cf. Psalm 11:4. Silence is a form of worship; see Revelation 8:1.

3:2

English translations follow the Masoretic text, but Pseudo-Matthew 14 (eighth century?) quotes a different reading from LXX which has been associated with the presence of animals at Jesus's birth: "In the midst of two living creatures you will be known, in the drawing near of the years you will be recognised, and when the right time comes you will be shown forth." This, together with ancient Christian artworks discovered recently, suggests that the details of the nativity story which are consistently and widely told, but not supported by the New Testament, such as the presence of an ox and an ass, are based on ancient sources.[2]

References:

  1. Swete, Dr H.B. The Parables of the Kingdom Glasgow University Press, 1920
  2. Barker, Margaret "Where Christmas came from" in Church Times 18/25 December 2020 p.32

© David Billin 2002–2021